I'm Itai Jamshy, an IDF soldier in the Film Unit of Education Corps from Ramat Gan, Israel. I love film and want to grow up to be a director. I also love photography and this blog is meant for me to share my photos and daily insight with you :)

 

Got featured on Radar! A thank-you letter to my followers

I woke up this morning early to pick up a good friend back home from her base, just to come back home and discover this:

image

And then, this:

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It made me so, so, very, very , VERY happy.

And I owe it all to YOU, the followers, you give me confidence in my work and now I feel an even better reason to go out and take pictures!! I feel so grateful and I owe my thanks to each and every one of you, new and old. New for giving me this thumbs up and old for keeping following this blog (and my partially improper English), although I had a lot of rough and dry times in the army recently.

I wish all the new followers a ‘pleasant stay’ and I promise to keep up with my work!

Love you all so much!

- Itai

P.S.: To all you photographers out there, keep the good work, my feed wouldn’t be so inspiring without you either.

A picture I took last week at the Jaffa Port Market.

A picture I took last week at the Jaffa Port Market.

Concluding my series from Armenia is a picture of one of the squares in Yerevan, the capital of Armenia. I really like the symmetrics of these main squares so I used my widest focal length and waited for the right moment.
The right moment came with the woman in the middle, which drives the main composition of the picture. Another thing I like in this picture is that everyone is either moving or in the middle of an action.

Concluding my series from Armenia is a picture of one of the squares in Yerevan, the capital of Armenia. I really like the symmetrics of these main squares so I used my widest focal length and waited for the right moment.

The right moment came with the woman in the middle, which drives the main composition of the picture. Another thing I like in this picture is that everyone is either moving or in the middle of an action.

lensblr-network:

Another nice macro shot I took in Armenia
by Itai Jamshy  (ijphoto.tumblr.com)

Another photo reblogged by lensblr!
Thank you all for the support! To all my new followers, hope you’ll enjoy my blog!

lensblr-network:

Another nice macro shot I took in Armenia

Another photo reblogged by lensblr!

Thank you all for the support! To all my new followers, hope you’ll enjoy my blog!

How long do you think this shot is?
I used a nice long exposure technique, using a five seconds (!) exposure, which let the light from above light my subject and enough time to use a flash to light the old stone inn.
This is another photo from Armenia. In the middle is our travel instructor, Shirin, one of the most amazing men I’ve ever met.
I’m running out of posts to write about, I pretty much summed up what I think about Armenia and what I’ve learned. Next posts are going to be only pictures and maybe a little bit of text.

How long do you think this shot is?

I used a nice long exposure technique, using a five seconds (!) exposure, which let the light from above light my subject and enough time to use a flash to light the old stone inn.

This is another photo from Armenia. In the middle is our travel instructor, Shirin, one of the most amazing men I’ve ever met.

I’m running out of posts to write about, I pretty much summed up what I think about Armenia and what I’ve learned. Next posts are going to be only pictures and maybe a little bit of text.

Follower Shoutout!

Each week, I’m going to thank my new followers and send links to their blogs!

This time it goes to

David Kracht - http://davekr8.tumblr.com/ who has a great photo blog!

and

draftpodium http://draftpodium.tumblr.com/

Thanks for the follow!

ijphoto:

Remember him? I took a picture of him more than a year ago. Then he was smiling. Today he’s tired and his business suffered because of the war.

For comparison:

Remember him? I took a picture of him more than a year ago. Then he was smiling. Today he’s tired and his business suffered because of the war.

Remember him? I took a picture of him more than a year ago. Then he was smiling. Today he’s tired and his business suffered because of the war.

A small disclaimer first: Sorry about the delay, I was called to assist in the war efforts this Monday and I’ve been filming (yes!) near the Gaza border in the last three days.
Continuing from last post, this picture shows authenticity. This time, we followed a hunch, stopped in the middle of the road and continued on food to a small settlement nearby. There, there was actually a community that’s basically secluded from the big world. We went in, asked to take pictures, again everyone gathered in one place and I went to look for something I found interesting. I started taking pictures of the milkmaids, and the showed these picture to the kids. Suddenly, this kid grabbed a stool and a bucked and started milking this cow, like he wanted me to take a picture of him. First, he was shy and didn’t look at the camera, but after a while, he started sneaking this little gaze, and I caught the picture. This magic moment made the day for me. He went nuts (in a good way) when I showed him the picture. By interacting intimately with the community, not lunging at them with my camera, I helped creating this moment, which gave me an authentic shot that even made my photography guides jealous.
So, we can learn that taking pictures isn’t all. A camera is a wonderful tool for interaction but you need to use your human skills more than your camera to achieve such moments. Sometime a big and bulky camera can be found offensive towards the subjects, so gear doesn’t matter either.
And that’s it.
I’m sad I can’t tell stories from Gaza because they’re strictly confidential. But know this: our soldiers fought bravely and they achieved great victory against the Hamas terror organization, and as an Israeli, I’m very proud of our army. But, as a human being, I think loses on both sides were devastating, and both sides should try and talk to achieve real, long lasting peace.
So long!

A small disclaimer first: Sorry about the delay, I was called to assist in the war efforts this Monday and I’ve been filming (yes!) near the Gaza border in the last three days.

Continuing from last post, this picture shows authenticity. This time, we followed a hunch, stopped in the middle of the road and continued on food to a small settlement nearby. There, there was actually a community that’s basically secluded from the big world. We went in, asked to take pictures, again everyone gathered in one place and I went to look for something I found interesting. I started taking pictures of the milkmaids, and the showed these picture to the kids. Suddenly, this kid grabbed a stool and a bucked and started milking this cow, like he wanted me to take a picture of him. First, he was shy and didn’t look at the camera, but after a while, he started sneaking this little gaze, and I caught the picture. This magic moment made the day for me. He went nuts (in a good way) when I showed him the picture.
 By interacting intimately with the community, not lunging at them with my camera, I helped creating this moment, which gave me an authentic shot that even made my photography guides jealous.

So, we can learn that taking pictures isn’t all. A camera is a wonderful tool for interaction but you need to use your human skills more than your camera to achieve such moments. Sometime a big and bulky camera can be found offensive towards the subjects, so gear doesn’t matter either.

And that’s it.

I’m sad I can’t tell stories from Gaza because they’re strictly confidential. But know this: our soldiers fought bravely and they achieved great victory against the Hamas terror organization, and as an Israeli, I’m very proud of our army. But, as a human being, I think loses on both sides were devastating, and both sides should try and talk to achieve real, long lasting peace.

So long!

The next installment in the Armenian series.
This time I’d like to write about unauthenticity and tourists traps. Compared to Georgia, Armenia is full with both of those. Take this picture for example, this guy looks like a real war hero, right? But, no, we found out every market sells these medallions for merely cents. Then I realized our tour guide gave this old man money to present himself. Armenia was full of those things unlike Georgia, which had real townsfolk who wanted to get their picture taken with no costs, taking their picture was a gift to them.
After a couple of days I started seeing this pattern and decided not to go along with the group. Sometimes I didn’t get off the bus with a camera at all, but after scouting the area I went with one other traveler and we searched for our own subjects to capture. In the end, we found some real authentic people, who gave us real reactions, and didn’t ask for money. It gave us a true window into their culture and everyday life, and made our experience better and much more satisfying.
The picture above is a BAD EXAMPLE. The good one will be in my next post, hopefully tomorrow morning.

The next installment in the Armenian series.

This time I’d like to write about unauthenticity and tourists traps. Compared to Georgia, Armenia is full with both of those. Take this picture for example, this guy looks like a real war hero, right? But, no, we found out every market sells these medallions for merely cents. Then I realized our tour guide gave this old man money to present himself. Armenia was full of those things unlike Georgia, which had real townsfolk who wanted to get their picture taken with no costs, taking their picture was a gift to them.

After a couple of days I started seeing this pattern and decided not to go along with the group. Sometimes I didn’t get off the bus with a camera at all, but after scouting the area I went with one other traveler and we searched for our own subjects to capture. In the end, we found some real authentic people, who gave us real reactions, and didn’t ask for money. It gave us a true window into their culture and everyday life, and made our experience better and much more satisfying.

The picture above is a BAD EXAMPLE. The good one will be in my next post, hopefully tomorrow morning.

Continuing my series from Armenia, after I fell into stressed times because of the war (I might tell that story later).
A shot I took after sunset with a huge flash umbrella the teacher gave me to play with.

Continuing my series from Armenia, after I fell into stressed times because of the war (I might tell that story later).

A shot I took after sunset with a huge flash umbrella the teacher gave me to play with.

classe asked
Still in time to give up with sionism, mate

First of all, it’s Zionism.

Second, what’s demonstrated now is a war that has nothing to do with Zionism. Zionism has already fulfilled itself when we got our own country. Ben Gurion, the first PM of IL said “Between choosing the whole land and a having our own Jewish country, we chose a Jewish country” and I still see this statement true to today (I wish our PM also saw it that way).

Hammas is manipulating the whole world by going to an all out war with a country it doesn’t stands a chance going against. And our country can’t stand still while the Hammas is building tunnels to go out in our territory and kill innocent citizens. They also sacrifice their own citizens to gain leverage. If it was happening in the US, they would’ve already wiped out the opposing country.

I’m an Israeli leftist, and a soldier and I truly hate this little war. I can’t say I’m proud of my country for going in on foot, but I can say they had good reasons, and that if we hadn’t, we could’ve have faced much worse consequences. I think both Hammas and the Israeli government DON’T want peace, because they both profit from a state of war. And who suffers the most? The common folk on both sides. And I think Zionism is to live in peace, and to resolve problems diplomatically, not violently.

So stop adding to the flame using words you don’t understand. We are all human beings.

I know this blog is about my photos, but I can’t be quite anymore about the situation here in Israel. I’ve been to the front, and I must say Israel has the right to defend itself.

I know this blog is about my photos, but I can’t be quite anymore about the situation here in Israel. I’ve been to the front, and I must say Israel has the right to defend itself.